Kashmir, Kashmir Timeline

Kashmir: Nuclear Flashpoint

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Women's voices from Kashmir

Recent articles on Kashmir

Kashmir in a nutshell

Indian Position on Kashmir

Pakistani Position on Kashmir

Kashmiri Position

Who are the Militants?

Who are the Kashmiri Leaders?

What about Article 370?

Popular Insurgency or Terrorism?

Is Kashmir movement communal?

Pandit tragedy

Pakistan's Record in Kashmir

Elections in Kashmir

plebiscite Conundrum

Is a solution possible?

Human Rights in Kashmir

Renegade Militants

Keywords: Kashmir Dispute. FAQ: Popular Insurgency or Terrorism? Is the Kashmiri movement communal? What about Plebiscite Conundrum? Who are the Militants? Keywords: Kashmir Dispute.

Keywords: Kashmir Insurgency. FAQ: Popular Insurgency or Terrorism? Is the Kashmiri movement communal? What about Plebiscite Conundrum? Who are the Militants? Keywords: Kashmir Insurgency.

Introduction
Pre-1947
1947 Kashmir War

1948-1954 UN efforts

1955-1964

1965 Kashmir war

1966-1986

1989 insurgency and after

1999 Kargil War and after

Bloodshed so far

Proposed solutions

Keywords: Kashmir Timeline. FAQ: Popular Insurgency or Terrorism? Is the Kashmiri movement communal? What about Plebiscite Conundrum? Who are the Militants? Keywords: Kashmir, Kashmir Timeline.

Keywords: Kashmir History. FAQ: Popular Insurgency or Terrorism? Is the Kashmiri movement communal? What about Plebiscite Conundrum? Who are the Militants? Keywords: Kashmir History.

Keywords: Kashmir conflict. FAQ: Popular Insurgency or Terrorism? Is the Kashmiri movement communal? What about Plebiscite Conundrum? Who are the Militants? Keywords: Kashmir conflict.

Vacuum in Kashmir

Tens of Thousands protest in August 2010
Tens of Thousands protest in Srinagar in August 2010

It is tempting to say that Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's visit to Srinagar on June 25 along with Congress president Sonia Gandhi reflected the same inadequacy of his current policies on Kashmir as does the limited rail link he inaugurated the next day between Banihal in Jammu and Qazigund, the gateway to the Valley. Vacuum in Kashmir. By A.G. Noorani





Introduction to Kashmir conflict

Protests in Tehran, 30 July 2009
Kashmiri women mouring the loss of their family members in violence[1]

Kashmir is bleeding, as we speak. The annual casualty rate is chillingly high. At least 40,000 people have been killed since insurgency began in 1989, according to conservative official estimates. Unofficial estimates are well over 80,000-half of them are civilians. Thousands of Indian soldiers have been killed and it costs billions of dollars to keep the army in Kashmir. There is one soldier for every 10 kashmiris in the Valley and daily life is a nightmare for the ordinary Kashmiri.

The Kashmir conflict continues to be unresolved after more than six decades, fuelling the conventional and nuclear arms race between India and Pakistan and bleeding their economy. Both countries have gone to war on three occasions over Kashmir and the possibility of war between the two countries has become frightening given their nuclear weapon capability.

Kashmir continues to be the bone of contention between India and Pakistan. Each side insists it is right and the other is wrong. India insists that the accession of Kashmir to India is final and complete and hence Kashmir is an integral part of India and that all would be well in Kashmir, but for Pakistan's cross-border terrorism. Pakistan on the other hand, insists that Kashmir is a disputed territory and that it is merely providing moral and diplomatic support for an indigenous freedom struggle in Kashmir. A large number of Kashmiris do not believe that the 1947 accession is final; they insist that Kashmir is a disputed territory and demand self-determination. Indian public is bombarded with the official version of rhetoric on Kashmir, as Pakistanis are bombarded likewise with their version.

Could we objectively revisit this complex issue which continues to exact increasing death toll of civilians, as each day passes? All sides cannot be right at once in their claims of absolute moral rectitude, the truth probably lies somewhere in between.


"I cannot drink water
It is mingled with the blood of young men who have died up in the mountains.
I cannot look at the sky; It is no longer blue; but painted red.
I cannot listen to the roar of the gushing stream
It reminds me of a wailing mother next to the bullet-ridden body of her only son.
I cannot listen to the thunder of the clouds It reminds me of a bomb blast.
I feel the green of my garden has faded Perhaps it too mourns.
I feel the sparrow and cuckoo are silent Perhaps they too are sad.
" A Kashmiri Poet



  • [1] Photo Courtesy: BBC. The design of some panels have been modelled after BBC News website. Some maps in other chapters have been courtesy of Wikipedia, Kashmir Study Group and other websites.